Browse Items (47 total)

Kodak House is in the Elizabeth Street mall in central Hobart. The top of the narrow five storey building has two narrow ‘towers’ on each end with a crenelated parapet running between them. In the centre is a shield bearing a ‘K’. The upper…

A monument to Sir John Eardley Wilmot (1783-1847) is situated in St David’s Park (previously a cemetery), Hobart. Wilmot was Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen’s Land (ie. Tasmania) between 1843 and 1847 and died of an undiagnosed illness after…

The former St Mary’s Hospital is on the corner of Davey Street and Salamanca Place, at the rear of Parliament House, in Hobart, Tasmania. Designed by William Porden Kay (1809-1870), it was built as a private sixty bed hospital for Dr Edward Samuel…

Flamingos Dance Bar at 201 Liverpool Street, Hobart, is in a medieval-inspired building. It has the appearance of a small fortification or castle, with a central tower and six fortified turrets. The brick building is topped by a crenelated parapet,…

This online article by Carol Raabus was posted in 2009 on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Hobart page. It is about local man Doug Pattison and his re-creation of siege engines. He has built a trebuchet, first used in the twelfth…

This photograph of a sign was taken at the rear of the Cascade Brewery. The sign features a warrior on horseback killing a dragon with a lance. The similarity of the sign to the original St George logo used by the Launceston brewery Boag’s,…

The current Government House of Tasmania, the third in Hobart, was designed by the Director of Public Works William Porden Kay and built between 1855 and 1857 in the Gothic Revival style. Governor Henry Fox Young took up residence on January 2, 1858.…

The 1949 article ‘Tasmania’s Historic Towers’ by M.S.R. Sharland appeared in the Hobart, Tasmania, based newspaper The Mercury. The article discusses a number of stand-alone towers in Tasmania, including two medieval-styled…