King Working-Man

Dublin Core

Title

King Working-Man

Subject

Eight hour day, Eight-hour day movement, freedom of labour, Peasants Revolt, organized labour, labour, labourer, work, worker, working class, Premier Gilles, unions, union, unionism

Description

This illustration portrays the great fear of the establishment in the late nineteenth century in Australia, an organised workforce. Union organisation and affiliation and the strengthening of fraternities and friendly societies appeared to create a monster. King Working-Man, with tin crown emboldened with the symbol of the eight-hour movement on it, with working man’s garb and hobnailed boots, lounges on his humble wooden throne clasping a sceptre. Premier Gilles is his attendant while wool, timber, shipping and sugar magnates grovel at his feet.

Creator

poss. ‘Tom’ Carrington (Francis Thomas Dean Carrington)

Source

Punch Magazine, Melbourne

Publisher

Punch Magazine, Melbourne

Date

18 August 1887

Rights

Public Domain

Format

Newspaper Illustration; Hyperlink

Files

Citation

“King Working-Man,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed June 25, 2021, https://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/253.