Notes from The Doctor’s Diary: Winter Dressing

Dublin Core

Title

Notes from The Doctor’s Diary: Winter Dressing

Subject

Anecdote, appendicitis, cat-gut, clothing, corset, diary, doctor, goitre, GP, health, medicine, medieval England, medieval health, medieval population, patient, physician, psychiatrist, psychiatric medicine, “Punch”, silkworm-gut, stitches, winter

Description

In this Western Mail column, a GP provides anecdotes from his consultations with patients. These include a man concerned about winter chills, a man whose father was either poisoned or died from appendicitis, a woman concerned about goitres and a patient to whom the doctor explained the difference between cat-gut and silkworm-gut stitches. At the end of the article is a section titled “Medieval Health, from this week’s reading”. Following two notes about the injurious historical practice of binding women’s waists and eighteenth-century corsets, this section contains the following curious comment about the perceived absence of psychiatric medicine in medieval England: “As ‘Punch’ points out, ‘The reason that there were no psychiatrists in medieval England is that the country was only sparsely inhabited’”.

Creator

Anon.

Source

National Library of Australia

Publisher

The Western Mail

Date

7 July 1949, pp. 30-31.

Rights

The Western Mail

Format

Newspaper Article

Language

English

Hyperlink Item Type Metadata

Files

Citation

“Notes from The Doctor’s Diary: Winter Dressing,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed August 9, 2020, https://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/206.