Early English Portraiture

Dublin Core

Title

Early English Portraiture

Subject

Beggar, De Regimine Principum, dialogue, Geoffrey Chaucer (c.1340-1400), heresy, John Gower (c.1330-1408), John Lydgate (c.1370-1450), knight, manuscript, marginalia, medieval dress, medieval poetry, Occleve, poet, poetry, portrait, Sir John Oldcastle (d.1417), The Regiment of Princes, Thomas Hoccleve (c.1367-1426), tribute, review

Description

In this Western Mail article from 1930, the author begins by providing a somewhat negative review of Thomas Hoccleve’s poem, “The Regiment of Princes”. Asserting that the poem “looks better than it reads”, the author describes it as a “long and tedious poem on virtues and vices in imitation of an older writing”. The author goes on to suggest that Hoccleve has “an historical, rather than a literary value”, because he drew in the margin of the book what was thought to be the most accurate portrait of his near contemporary, Geoffrey Chaucer (c.1340-1400), and revered him in the text. The author concludes that although not a great poet, Hoccleve was probably an “earnest, forthright man”, because he knew his limitations.

Thomas Hoccleve (c.1367-1426) was an English poet and clerk of the Privy Seal. “The Regiment of Princes” was written in 1410-11 and was addressed to Prince Henry, the future King Henry V. It describes the virtues of a good ruler, and survives in 43 manuscript copies. For the text of Hoccleve’s “The Regiment of Princes”, see http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/hoccfrm.htm.

Creator

Anon.

Source

National Library of Australia

Date

11 December 1930, p. 12.

Rights

Western Mail

Format

Newspaper Article

Language

English

Hyperlink Item Type Metadata

Citation

“Early English Portraiture,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed May 23, 2017, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/158.