Medievalism on the Page

Description

This Collection examines literary medievalism from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. It traces an arc from the populist literary medievalism of the nineteenth century, through the more rarefied modernist turn of the mid-twentieth century, to the re-emergence of popular forms such as children’s literature and fantasy since the 1980s. In this Collection you will find items relating to printed medievalist works and also to medievalism operating in print, for example in references to medieval events, people, and literature in nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts and dramatic works.

Items in the Medievalism on the Page Collection

In this children's comic strip from the Sydney Morning Herald, the medieval themes of chivalry and gallantry are combined with anglicised Australian animal icons. In the comic, a dream is depicted in which Kaark the Crow imagines himself as a…

In this children's comic strip from the Sydney Morning Herald in 1947, Sir Kaark the crow escapes from the clutches of a hungry dragon by donning the armour of a knight who is bathing in a pool nearby. He is then asked to rescue the 'Lady in…

Sir Kaark the Crow is a children's comic strip that featured in the Sydney Morning Herald. Set in a medieval land of dragons, knights, wizards and a bad baron, it combined common medieval themes such as chivalry and gallantry with animal characters…

A scanned copy of the journal of Arthur Bowes Smyth held by the National Library of Australia. Smyth was the surgeon responsible for the women convicts on the Lady Penrhyn in the First Fleet, from 22 March 1787 – 8 August 1789. The journal contains…

A drawing of a heraldic shield redolent of medieval manuscript annotation found on the second last page of the Journal of Arthur Bowes Smyth. Smyth (1750-1790) was the surgeon responsible for the women convicts on the Lady Penrhyn in the First Fleet,…

An article from the Sydney Morning Herald notifying readers of a second performance of Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. The performance by graduates and undergraduates of the University of Sydney was of a section of Malory's work, The Quest for the Holy…

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33143579

In this Western Mail article from 1930, the author begins by providing a somewhat negative review of Thomas Hoccleve’s poem, “The Regiment of Princes”. Asserting that the poem “looks better than it reads”, the author…

This artwork by artist Daniel Rutter Long is titled ‘Road Knights’. Completed in 1883, it is a watercolour and pencil painting depicting a rural farmhouse, cows, trees, an Aboriginal man wearing European dress, a seated woman and a child. The…

This column from the Colonial Literary Journal in 1844 provides a biography of medieval poet Geoffrey Chaucer. Quoting from an unnamed source, the article names Chaucer alongside Spenser, Shakespeare and Milton as one of the ‘Four Great English…