Launceston Post Office interior, Launceston, Tasmania

Dublin Core

Title

Launceston Post Office interior, Launceston, Tasmania

Subject

Australia Post, Byzantine, Lesley Gordon Corrie, William W. Eldridge, Free Romanesque, Launceston, Launceston Post Office, lead lighting, Alexander North, post office, quadrangle, Queen Anne Style, Romanesque, semi-circular arch, Tas, Tasmania.

Description

The Launceston Post Office is in the centre of the Tasmanian city of Launceston, and is one of four Heritage Property Showcase buildings of Australia Post for 2012. It was designed by architect William W. Eldridge (1850-1933) in 1885 with some alterations made by architects Lesley Gordon Corrie (1859-1918) and Alexander North (1858-1945) in 1890, the year the building opened. The red brick and freestone Post Office is in the Federation Queen Anne style, and incorporating elements of Free Romanesque. The Romanesque elements are obvious in the unusual interior which features an internal quadrangle (now glassed in) with balconies and windows. These elements include prominent use of semi-circular arches in the doorways and windows, and a pattern of alternating red brick and freestone, also known as ‘blood and bandage’, to highlight these features. The interior also includes leadlight windows.

For the exterior see http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/1237

http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/1242

For the Australian Heritage Database entry on the building see http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search.pl?mode=place_detail;search=place_name%3Dlaunceston%2520post%2520office%3Btown%3Dlaunceston%3Bstate%3DTAS%3Bkeyword_PD%3Don%3Bkeyword_SS%3Don%3Bkeyword_PH%3Don%3Blatitude_1dir%3DS%3Blongitude_1dir%3DE%3Blongitude_2dir%3DE%3Blatitude_2dir%3DS%3Bin_region%3Dpart;place_id=105210

Creator

McLeod, Shane

Date

November 29, 2012

Rights

No Copyright

Format

4xDigital Photograph

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

Digital Photograph; JPEG

Files

Citation

“Launceston Post Office interior, Launceston, Tasmania,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed July 28, 2017, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/1252.