‘The Warrior’

Dublin Core

Title

‘The Warrior’

Subject

Adelaide Hills, Anglo-Saxons, arms, armor, armour, axe, Battle of Hastings, Bayeux Tapestry, chain mail, chainmail, francisca, Franks, gloves, Gumeracha Medieval Fair, knife, long knife, medieval fair, mitons, Normans, re-enactment, reenactment, SA, seax, South Australia, throwing axe, Wendi Donaldson

Description

This photo, taken by photographer Wendi Donaldson at the Gumeracha Medieval Fair in South Australia in May 2011, provides a unique glimpse of a ‘living’ early medieval warrior (who could be from almost anywhere in Europe). It depicts a participant at the Fair wearing chain-mail gloves, known as mitons, and a ‘Norman’ style helmet complete with the distinctive nasal bar which was designed to protect the face from injury. He carries a francisca throwing axe, which is a weapon that was developed by the Franks but also used by early Anglo-Saxons, in one hand and a second weapon that is not clear but that is probably a long knife known as a seax (given the sheath tied to his belt) in the other. Great care is taken by festival organisers and participants alike to ensure that costumes and weapons are within the recognised parameters of the era; however, this warrior does mix early medieval chronologies. For example, both Anglo-Saxons and Normans are depicted wearing this style of helmet in the Bayeaux Tapestry at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, but no-one in the Tapestry has chain-mail gloves.
The Gumeracha Medieval Fair is an annual event sponsored by the Adelaide Hills Council. The Fair features a host of re-enactment groups from around the world, including handcraft stallholders, wandering musicians and entertainers. This is just one of several interesting medieval events held throughout the country at different times of the year.

Creator

Donaldson, Wendi

Date

May 2011

Rights

© All images copyright Wendi Donaldson 2011

Format

Hyperlink

Files

Citation

“‘The Warrior’,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed September 16, 2019, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/711.