Distinctions

Dublin Core

Title

Distinctions

Subject

bench, church court, Cope, County Court, court, crime, criminal classes, criminal justice, criminal law, ecclesiastical court, General Sessions, judge, judiciary, judicial, justice, Kalgoorlie, law, legal profession, magistrate, Nolan, offence, punishment, Quinlan, religion, sentence, sessions, Skinner, tribunal, WA, Western Australia

Description

In this article from the Kalgoorlie Western Argus, an opening statement about the strength and integrity of the County Court bench in 1900 is contrasted with comments about the incompetence of former members of the judiciary. Four judges are identified as having been ‘lame ducks’, the worst of whom was a man named Quinlan. He, the author suggests “was more fitted for an ecclesiastical medieval tribunal than a secular modern court” because he allowed his religious zeal to influence his decisions, sentencing a defendant who stole from a church with much more severity that one who stole from a private dwelling. “These distinctions between the house of God and that of plain Bill Smith may be acceptable in older countries”, the article continues, “but not in this new land”.

Creator

Anon.

Source

National Library of Australia

Publisher

Kalgoorlie Western Argus

Date

17 May 1900, p. 25.

Rights

Kalgoorlie Western Argus

Format

PDF; Newspaper Article

Language

English

Document Item Type Metadata

Original Format

National Library of Australia,  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32493762

Citation

“Distinctions,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed March 21, 2019, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/462.