"Gargoyles of Melbourne: Quaint and Curious Carvings by John Russell Parry," in The Argus

Dublin Core

Title

"Gargoyles of Melbourne: Quaint and Curious Carvings by John Russell Parry," in The Argus

Subject

carving, gargoyle, gargoyles, Gothic, Gothic architecture, John Russell Parry, Latin, Melbourne, Old French, sculpture, The Argus, VIC, Victoria

Description

A lengthy illustrated article by John Russell Parry about gargoyles in Melbourne that appeared in the Melbourne newspaper The Argus on August 10, 1929. The article provides the etymology of 'gargoyle', derived from Latin via Old French, and explains that a gargoyle must have a water spout, and that many of the carvings that the public thought were gargoyles were merely decorative. True gargoyles in Melbourne are said to exist at St Paul's Cathedral, St Patrick's Cathedral, Tower House, the E.S. and A. Bank Building, and the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Hawthorn. The article also has information on carvings in Melbourne which are not true gargoyles, and some interesting information on medieval gargoyles in France, including at Notre Dame in Paris. Gargoyles are a common feature of Gothic architecture.

Creator

Parry, John Russell

Source

National Library of Australia: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4028660

Publisher

The Argus

Date

10 August 1929

Contributor


Rights

National Library of Australia

Format

Newspaper article

Citation

“"Gargoyles of Melbourne: Quaint and Curious Carvings by John Russell Parry," in The Argus,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed August 22, 2019, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/35.