Bigoted Bedrock of Our Law

Dublin Core

Title

Bigoted Bedrock of Our Law

Subject

Act of Settlement (1701), Anne Boleyn (c.1500-1536), anti-Catholicism, Australian constitution, British throne, Charles III (b.1948), Commonwealth, constitution, constitutional law, David Cameron (b.1966), Elizabeth II (b.1926), feudal principle, inheritance, Kate Middleton (b.1982), law, laws, legal, monarch, monarchy, primogeniture, protestantism, republican campaign, republicanism, royal tradition, Saxe-Coburg Gotha, succession, Thomas Paine (1737-1809), throne, Tony Blair (b.1953), treason, Treason Act (1351), William V (b.1982), Windsor

Description

Amidst media fervour over the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton (Princess Catherine), Geoffrey Robertson raises the Australian republican question in this opinion piece. Beginning with reference to Thomas Paine’s denunciation of hereditary monarchy and the religious bias of the 1701 Act of Settlement which prevents non-Protestant heirs from succeeding to the British throne, Robertson suggests that Australia’s enduring penchant for royal tradition is what keeps it part of the commonwealth. He goes on to cite examples of what he refers to as ‘medieval nonsense’ that ‘still applies in Australia’, including the feudal principle of primogeniture, the 1351 Treason Act and obsolete but unrepealed laws such as one that vests the ownership of wild swans with the monarch.

Creator

Robertson, Geoffrey QC

Source

The Age

Publisher

The Age

Date

29 April 2011

Rights

The Age

Format

Online Newspaper Article

Language

English

Files

Citation

“Bigoted Bedrock of Our Law,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed March 20, 2019, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/315.