Magna Carta

Dublin Core

Title

Magna Carta

Subject

Angevin Kings, anniversary, British Museum, Charter, citizens, classroom, law, constitution, legal, constitutional law, Dover Castle, fair trial, Great Charter (1215), Great Seal, King John (r.1199-1216), Lincoln Cathedral, Magna Carta, medieval law, medieval statute, Norman Kings, Runnimede, Salisbury Cathedral, school lessons, significance, State high schools, statute, Rule of Law

Description

On the seven hundred and twentieth anniversary of the first issue of Magna Carta (in 1215), this article in the Western Mail outlines the charter’s significance for English history and notes that special lessons had been delivered in Australian State high schools in recognition of its importance. The article begins by suggesting that the Great Charter differed only in degree from the previous charters of Norman and Angevin Kings, but then goes on to draw particular attention to the Magna Carta’s role in outlining the mutual obligations of the King and his feudal vassals, in removing weirs from rivers to facilitate inland transport, and in affording to all classes of freemen the right to a fair trial. The article also describes the location and state of the four surviving copies of the charter bearing the Great Seal of King John, including two in the British Museum and one each in the Lincoln and Salisbury Cathedrals.

Creator

Anon.

Source

National Library of Australia

Publisher

The West Australian

Date

15 June 1935, p. 11

Rights

The West Australian

Format

Newspaper Article

Language

English

Document Item Type Metadata

Citation

“Magna Carta,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed June 19, 2018, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/255.