May

Dublin Core

Title

May

Subject

celebration, custom, dancing, festivities, James II (r.1685-1688), Maia, May, May Day, maypole, medieval custom, medieval festivities, medieval procession, merrymaking, public holiday, puritans, Restoration, Roman, Romans

Description

In this article from the Western Mail, the author relates details of the historical customs and festivities associated with the month of May. The article begins by describing the medieval tradition of ‘a-maying’ and merrymaking on the first day of the month: ‘May day’. This involved processions and dancing, often around a maypole. Maypoles, the author goes on to explain, were viewed as especially objectionable by the Puritans in the seventeenth century, and banned by Parliament between 1644 and 1660. The article concludes by suggesting that the name ‘may’ was most likely Roman in origin - after Maia, the mother of Mercury.

Creator

Anon.

Source

National Library of Australia

Publisher

The Western Mail

Date

9 May 1946, p.3

Rights

The Western Mail

Format

Newspaper Article

Language

English

Document Item Type Metadata

Original Format

Citation

“May,” Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory, accessed April 25, 2019, http://ausmed.arts.uwa.edu.au/items/show/245.